Robert Yanders' stock raisers at the Tournament of Champions

The 2019 Tournament of Champions has multiple nationally ranked prospects. There is always room to grow, and Robert Yanders has noted a few players that have raised their stock.

With two days down and one to go, Southwest Missouri has seen some of the best basketball teams and players the country has to offer. Some of these guys are already ranked pretty highly - including the nation’s top prospect - James Wiseman.

If you are number one, your stock can’t go up. For every single other player however, there is always at least one more step you can take to raise stock.

With such an impressive array of talent, the Tournament of Champions is an ideal spot for iron to sharpen iron. There is no better time to outwork and outpace your competitors than when going head-to-head. The Basketball Movement’s Founder, Robert Yanders has selected a few guys from the first two nights of action that have raised there stock.

Jared Jones - McEachern

In the McEachern vs. Shadow Mountain game last night, all eyes were on Jaelen House vs. Sharife Cooper. McEachern came out on top to advance to the Chamiponship tonight, but it was a bumpy ride. Jared Jones was a steady presence for the team, blocking multiple shots and putting in 12 points with big plays at the right time.

The Northwestern commit was quiet night one, but his play in game two against an even better squad was noteworthy. His athleticism, strong defense, and knack for a big stage earn him a spot among Rob’s stock raisers.

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Alyn Breed - McEachern

Joining Jones on the way to the championship tonight is his teammate - SG Alyn Breed. Has done an excellent job of taking pressure off of his fellow backcourt players. He has 20 total points through the first couple of games, but has done an excellent job on the perimeter and is playing good defense.

His athleticism allows him to play bigger than his 6’3” frame, and he is not afraid to scrap for boards. He has heard from some smaller schools in the Northeast, but has the looks of an underrated prospect.

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Noel Coleman - Sunrise Christian

Meeting McEachern in the championship with be Sunrise Christian Academy. Sunrise has some big names, but the offense starts with PG Noel Coleman.

Coleman is listed at 6’1” but has relatively nice length and explosiveness. He is a solid distributor on a deep and talented team - he deserves to be getting more attention at the collegiate level.

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Jovan Blacksher - Shadow Mountain

Grand Canyon commit, Jovan Blacksher has been in his bag all weekend. When he isn’t keeping the ball on a string, he is unleashing a barrage of threes like he did last night. His three triples in a row kept Shadow Mountain hanging tough, though they eventually fell to McEachern.

His well-rounded, yet scoring-oriented game actually reminds a bit of his coach, former NBA player, Mike Bibby.

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Zach Howell - Springfield Catholic

The Basketball Movement gym rat, Zach Howell looked good last night and has been showing that with minutes, he can be a great contributor, even on an already good team. Catholic played a great game last night despite the outcome. Part of that renewed vigor coming off a big night one loss was provided by Howell, whose outside shooting and competitive fire were big for the Irish.

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That’s it for Robert Yanders’ stock raisers from the first two nights of action. Ahead of tonight’s big games, dunk contest, and more, be sure to follow Rob Yanders on Instagram to be the first to see his picks for the Tournament of Champions fab five. See you tonight.

"The person is the player"

A Rob Yanders quote cuts deep as we reflect on the impact your life can have on your game.

Often, we are told to shut out emotions as players. The ideal basketball player is always calm, cool, and collected. It is one thing to play with passion, but carrying feelings of sadness, anger, or even a carefree attitude onto the court can negatively impact your play. All of this may be true, but it is unrealistic to expect this from players at all times.

Whether or not you realize it, your life is affecting you on the basketball court. This can be a positive or negative thing. When things are going well in your life, you have less worries. Less worry means less distraction to take away from what you are doing in game-time situations. Basketball can be a distraction from life on its own, but life always finds its way into your thoughts and demeanor.

“The person is the player” is a favorite quote of The Basketball Movement’s Founder, Rob Yanders. This quote was first brought to my attention in an interview with Trae Bell-Haynes, a pro player in Germany. Rob understands that players are more than just guards and forwards - they are people; sons, daughters, friends, students, employees, what have you.

This understanding is what makes Rob such a great coach. He cares for his players and knows that one way to improve on the court is to have a happy life.

Eliminating negativity from your life can be important for not just basketball, but everything you do. The issue with eliminating negativity is that it isn’t always possible. You can cut out toxic friends and influences, but some potentially negative aspects of your life may be more permanent.

It may be easier said than done, but it is important to try and shape the negativity into controlled aggression, motivation, and a competitive advantage. No one knows exactly what you’re going through besides yourself. If you must dwell on those issues, put a positive spin on them. Use things like basketball to enhance your life by making you rise above your problems. Not much beats the feeling of netting a shot, outrunning an opponent for a loose ball, or skying over everyone for a rebound. The harder you play, the more the issues of the world melt away.

There are hurdles to overcome in sport and in life. Sport is a very valuable learning ground for how to live your life in the best possible way.
— Lynn Davies

If things are generally positive in your life, you will naturally have fewer worries on the court. On the flip side though, you may have less reason to have an edge or play with a chip on your shoulder.

As a player, I personally had a pretty carefree attitude. Win-lose-or-draw, I was about the same after each game. I was happy to have been able to play and not too concerned when I didn’t get in as much as I would like. As a person, this contentment certainly seemed like a strength. As a player however, it resulted in a lack of drive that could hold me back in a competitive situation.

Positive thinking is more than just a tagline. It changes the way we behave. And I firmly believe that when I am positive, it not only makes me better, but it also makes those around me better.
— Harvey Mackay

Everyone is different. Each individual player has a unique situation and a unique way to cope. At The Basketball Movement, Rob Yanders and his coaches are able to bring out a competitive fire in complacent players like I used to be. They can also teach players with more difficult backgrounds to take what they feel may be holding them back and turn it into a monstrous drive to succeed.

Do your best to mold your life into what you want it to be. For help translating everything to the basketball court, contact The Basketball Movement here!

Defensive physicality: A Rob Yanders specialty

The Basketball Movement is a place that encompasses every aspect of the game - from offensive skill, defense, and beyond.

Rob Yanders, founder of The Basketball Movement, is always pushing his players to be the best men and women they can be. On and off the court, TBM prepares players to be disciplined, respectful team players.

There are many lessons to be learned out on the hardwood. Robert taught me (@WilHarrington) multiple lessons through the sport of basketball. One that stood out to me as a relatively under-sized player was defensive toughness and physicality.

Rob is not the biggest player himself, so he can bring perspective to players of all sizes. In his career (and still today), he played like a player much bigger than he is.

Robert taught me about defensive toughness the hard way

I was invited to one of Rob's many camps one Summer when I was probably 14 or 15 years old. I had been playing for a while at this point, but still certainly had plenty left to learn.

Skill-wise, I was a little behind most of the players at the camp. I was among the shorter players there as well, so I was feeling like I had a lot to prove. As always, Robert had us doing unique and engaging drills that had players visibly improving with each passing moment.

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Towards the end of the day, we started doing more "game scenario" drills that acted as small scrimmages. Rob is a pretty hands-on teacher, so he inserted himself in some of these drills, often matched up with myself since he is a guard.

He kicked my butt.

I was a pretty quick kid, but he managed to make me look like I had cement blocks for shoes. He kept one hand on me at all times, which is common to keep track of the player being guarded. What was uncommon was the firmness of that stiff-arm. Without fouling, he managed to dictate my every move.

He also used his body to establish a strong based and plant himself in front of me everywhere I tried to go. I felt like a big, strong post-player was shadowing me on the perimeter - it was exhausting and frustrating as an offensive player.

So what to do?

I could have plowed through him and starting picking up offensive fouls (in a drill...), but I decided to just soak up what he was doing to me and make mental notes of everything.

We finished the day with a full court 5-on-5 scrimmage. I did not start in the game but was prepared to make an impact coming off of the bench

A lot of the players I guarded were not only bigger than me, but at least as fast. I kept a strong hand on them at all times and tried to be a pest, cutting them off everywhere they turned and staying low. I picked up some charges and was able to prevent my man from doing what he wanted.

I carried that defensive physicality and tenacity forward as a player, eventually being known as a defensive specialist - an important piece to any team.

I have said this before, but I will continue to say it again and again: Parents, get your kids involved with Robert Yanders and The Basketball Movement. It helped me grow as a player and in my discipline and toughness as a person. Contact us here to make this happen as soon as possible.

 

Rob Yanders: Playing professionally overseas

The Basketball Movement's founder, Rob Yanders dishes on his experience playing professional ball in Europe.

Rob Yanders' local impact through The Basketball Movement has been immense. He cherishes this community and is here to give back and enhance it through the sport he loves. Rob's time in Springfield and West Plains was a big part of his career, but his professional experience led him to a much different place.

For some of us, it is easy to forget that there is more to basketball than what we see in high school, the NCAA, and NBA. There are basketball teams all over the world; many are at the professional level.

The Movement is very unique in that it offers Euro Preparation to players that are looking to break into the pro scene. Rob's experience is an amazing resource for any American player considering playing basketball abroad.

I (@WilHarrington) sat down with Robert at The Basketball Movement to talk about his time in Europe.

Rob's experience playing overseas

After college, Rob Yanders headed to Sheffield, England to begin his rookie year of pro ball. He said that it was certainly a culture shock, but the team won the British Championship, easing his transition. "When you're successful and winning, everything is great." He credits the people he met and his teammate for helping to make it a great experience.

My experience in Europe helped mold me into the person I am today - my experiences getting away and getting cultured through these different walks of life. Sheffield, France, Scotland, Treviso, Norway, Zurich, Germany, Israel - because of basketball. Because of that round, orange thing, I’ve been to some amazing places.

In his pro career, he went on to win three European Championships, two regular season Championships, a National Cup, and Finals MVP. In France, Rob was also voted team MVP with both VCB and KABCA teams and earned All-Star Team honors in 2012. His time as a pro in Europe was certainly a success.

How Rob applies what he learned to The Basketball Movement

As a pro, Robert told me that you are always thinking about what comes next. Players are rarely guaranteed a safety net in their brief careers. When Rob thought about what he wanted to do, he leaned on what made him happy: basketball.

Enjoying and being around the sport of basketball does not have to end when playing days are over. Robert was a Community Recreation major in college and knew that he wanted to build or run a sports facility.

I grew up in Salvation Army, Boys and Girls Clubs, and YMCA’s. Those were places that gave me shelter to play the game and keep me safe from the streets.

He talked about the alone time you experience playing in a foreign country and the amount of time it allowed him to reflect on the future. He also got to participate in many camps, clinics, speaking opportunities, and mentorships. His leadership grew even more and allowed him to confidently assume his role within The Movement as founder and owner.

Advice for players considering college or the pro game

The advice that Robert shared on this topic centered around personal circumstances - situations vary greatly from player to player.

Do what’s best for your family. Invest in you and invest in your family - your time is valuable. Make sure you get the right council and information.

Rob also warned that the pro game will be a stark contrast for any players that are talented enough to play professionally straight out of high school. Playing with grown men that are playing for paychecks is a whole new world.

If the opportunity for a "one-and-done" type of player to play professionally presented itself, and they needed money, he may recommend going if the player is confident in professional ball as a career. For most though, an education is always a great idea. It will pay off more than fizzling out after a few pro seasons.

As Rob mentioned, receiving the right council and information is very important when considering playing in Europe or anywhere else. Coach Rob, Coach Anthony Shavies, and more can help players with this preparation right here at The Basketball Movement.

If you are interested in any capacity in playing overseas, please contact us and let us help you navigate the intimidating options that follow.