Push limits with Rob Yanders and The Basketball Movement

What limits you from being the best player you can possibly be? The Basketball Movement can help you push those limits.

Every individual has limits, whether perceived or literal. A literal limit may be that you are considered undersized for the sport of basketball; you can’t change when you are done growing. A perceived limit is that your small stature means you can’t guard bigger players, get up for rebounds, and so on. Those are perceived limits because you can do something to change that. We can help.

When they say you can’t, they show you their limits, not yours.
— Kevin Keenoo

One of the biggest lessons that I (Site Blogger, @WilHarrington) learned growing up came on the basketball court. My teacher was Robert Yanders.

I’d been working out with Rob on and off for a year or so and was just 13 or 14 years old. I had started bringing a teammate along and it was definitely elevating our skill level. The breakthrough for me though was all about pushing limits and the power of mind over matter.

We were nearing the end of one of Rob’s trademark grueling workouts, got to shed our weighted vests, and got on the line to do some running. He wanted us to do a simple down-and-back, but put a very limited amount of time on the clock. He blew his whistle and my friend and I took off, touched the line to head back, and didn’t quite make it before the buzzer sounded.

We thought Rob was simply going to have us try again. However, he stepped over to the scorer’s table and took a second off the clock. Was this punishment? We lined up again, made our attempt… and missed the mark. We were completely exhausted at this point. What did Rob do? Let us grab a drink to come back and try again? Let us hit the restroom to vomit in peace? Of course, he took another second off the clock.

My friend and I never made eye contact, but we clearly had the same thought flash in our mind. “This guys is crazy. This is an all-out sprint, because if we don’t do it this time, we’ll be doing this until we leave in wheelchairs.”

“Ready,” Rob shouted with his whistle in his mouth. “Go!”

Adrenaline propelled our tired legs and carried us like we were running for our lives. There was nothing but teeth gritting, sweat flying, and the blur of two desperate white boys moving faster than they had ever moved. We went down and back, both touching the final baseline with a second or two to spare.

This lesson didn’t change the fact that I was five-foot-eight and just interested in playing the sport for fun. I never had NCAA aspirations or professional delusions. But what I learned that day shaped me as an athlete in general and as a person. It showed me that my limits were in my hands and I could push them as far as I wanted.

The confidence I gained from that day in the gym that would become The Basketball Movement helped me to push my high school self to two All-State baseball selections, contribute to a basketball team that took 3rd in state, be an All-District cross country runner (hell, even All-District choir for that matter), and the courage to date the girl that would become my wife.

That all may seem like a real leap to draw from a down-and-back run. Those who have trusted Rob Yanders to help them like I have can attest to what I’m saying though.

Asuming you are not already the best in the world, you must try to push your limits to see what you can really do. Not only on the court, but in all aspects of life. For those interested - reach out. The Basketball Movement was built for this. We’re ready if you are.

Rob Yanders' first wave of Invitational players

With the date of The Basketball Movement Invitational drawing closer, Rob Yanders has put out his first 50 invitations

Primarily keeping things in-state to start, The Basketball Movement’s Rob Yanders has put out the first 50 names to be invited to the prestigious Invitational Camp. If you have been following along on our Instagram, you have already seen several local names dropping in. The list has recently been bolstered with some of the top talent in Missouri and beyond.

Big names are already on the board in this first 50 selection. Per Rob, a few of the biggest are: Patrick Baldwin (6’8” Hamilton High, WI) , Michael Foster Jr. (6’8” Hillcrest Prep, WI), Desmond Polk (6’4” La Lumiere, WI), Phillip Russell (5’10” Vashon High), Jordan Nesbitt (6’6” StL Christian Academy), Anton Brookshire (6’2” Kickapoo High), Rashad McDaniels (6’0” StL Christian Academy), and Kentucky commit Cam’Ron Fletcher (6’5” Vashon High).

The talent keeps going, with other notable players such as: , Luke Kasubke (6’5” Chaminade Prep), Ryan Kalkbrenner (7’0” Trinity Catholic High), Kobe Clark (6’4” Vashon High), Caleb Love (6’3” Christian Brothers College High), Rob Martin (5’9” Christian Brothers College High), Evan Guillory (6’2” Joplin High), Alex Martini (6’8” Carthage High), Quenton Shelton (6’2” Lebanon High), Dantae Taylor (6’1” Parkview High), and Isaac Haney (6’0” Dora High).

Rounding out the first 50 invitees are: Austin Garrett, Anthony Green, Andrew McMillin, Bline Cline, Cameron Liggins, Carson Noel, Devon McMillin, Elijah Bridgers, Evan Mayse, Elijah Whitley, Grisham Aleshire, Jaiden Carrasqullo, Jadon Gilpin, Jason Jones, Jordan Kerr, Joshua Tate, Kamaren Bevel, Kaden Bruce, Kyke Flavin, Kanon Gipson, Kelby Stuckey, Logan Applegate, Lucas Kimbrough, Shawn Killion, Sergio McClain, Trevon Brazile, Ty Cooper, Tavari Eckwood, Tyler Harmon, Tyren Hendrix, and Zach Howell.

Sporting so much elite talent, the camp also acts as a showcase of sorts. SLAM, Ballislife, and more will be in attendance. Sponsors as of now are: Nike, Eastbay, Spalding, Houlihan’s, Hilton Garden Inn, Guaranty Bank, Old Missouri Bank, and TLC Properties.

We know we have been all up in your feed with talk about The Basketball Movement Invitational. The thing is though, there is plenty to talk about! We count on our following being fans of basketball. If that is true and you are a fan of the sport at any level, you have to see this camp and you have to watch these young men in action.

It will have traditional camp elements such as skill development, maintenance, and enhancement. However, it will be ramped up beyond what most players may be used to. The drills will pit these elite talents against each other with the understanding that iron sharpens iron. Game-situations and competitive opportunities will abound, making the whole thing a visual feast for basketball purists.

Remember to check back here and on our social media pages for the final 50 invites as well as more details on the 10.4-6-.19 event.

Rob Yanders Better Vibin Session - Alize Johnson

The Basketball Movement’s second Rob Yanders Better Vibin Session is in the books, featuring Alize Johnson.

The Founder of The Basketball, but also its lead Trainer, Coach, and driving force, Robert Yanders is on a mission to not only step up the games of those around him, but his own as well. To help him do that, he created the Rob Yanders Better Vibin Sessions.

Already with one session under his belt, Rob recently sat with Yanders Law, Kickapoo, and The Basketball Movement gym rat, Anton Brookshire. Aside from being his uncle, Rob coaches Anton as well. That session was all about connecting not only as a player and coach, but as family. The second vibin session is all about reconnecting with a longtime friend in more of a mentor-style relationship.

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Alize Johnson is best known around Southwest, Missouri as one of the most decorated Missouri State Basketball players of all-time. The basketball world now knows him best as a second round NBA draft pick, playing with both the Indiana Pacers and their G-League affiliate.

Johnson flashed his upside in the G-League last season, averaging a double-double as a small forward. His tenacious rebounding and efficient scoring during this recent NBA Summer League earned him a guaranteed contract with the Pacers.

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Yanders got to know Johnson during his time at MSU, working him out here at The Basketball Movement and giving him advice as he approached his pro career. In this Better Vibin Session, Alize and Rob reminisce about those times and talk about loyalty to those that aid you in your journey.

The Basketball Movement was proud to host the Alize Johnson Camp recently, which was the reason he was back in town. Giving back is big for both Alize and Rob, so they hold a mutual respect and admiration for each other, which shines through in this session.

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In the Vibin Session, they discuss where Alize comes from and where he’s going, loyalty, family, and more. This is two professionals at opposite ends of their careers - Alize is starting out and learning the ropes and Rob is done playing for a paycheck, but now using basketball as a tool to fuel the passions of others.

You have to check out this Rob Yanders Better Vibin Session! Below is the full video, but make sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel to make sure you catch the next one too!

The Rob Yanders Better Vibin Sessions

The Basketball Movement’s new video series is setting out to raise the bar on coach and player relationships.

Recently, The Basketball Movement’s Founder, Robert Yanders has set out to make new improvements to his organization. The facility itself has seen so much love over the last few years, but this improvement will be different.

Yanders is striving to improve his relationships with The Basketball Movement’s athletes by getting to know them through his Better Vibin Sessions.

The sessions are simply Coach Rob sitting down with some of the facility’s most frequent attendees to get to know them as people. Rob always says “The person is the player,” so getting to know them better as people will allow for better relationships and chemistry on the court.

Another goal of Better Vibin is to have conversations that bring back the root of player’s passion for the game to re-ignite the fire that keeps them going.

The first session is already up on YouTube and can be seen below. Rob’s first guest is his own nephew, Kickapoo High and Yanders Law guard, Anton Brookshire. Anton is originally from Milwaukee, WI and has received significant collegiate interest after only his sophomore season from schools like Iowa State and Missouri State.

The video features Rob and Anton just vibin about kicks, basketball, the future, and family. Check it out!

There will of course be more of these sessions headed your way soon, so make sure you are subscribed to our Youtube channel and are following along with us on social media. Until next time!

Rob Yanders: Playing professionally overseas

The Basketball Movement's founder, Rob Yanders dishes on his experience playing professional ball in Europe.

Rob Yanders' local impact through The Basketball Movement has been immense. He cherishes this community and is here to give back and enhance it through the sport he loves. Rob's time in Springfield and West Plains was a big part of his career, but his professional experience led him to a much different place.

For some of us, it is easy to forget that there is more to basketball than what we see in high school, the NCAA, and NBA. There are basketball teams all over the world; many are at the professional level.

The Movement is very unique in that it offers Euro Preparation to players that are looking to break into the pro scene. Rob's experience is an amazing resource for any American player considering playing basketball abroad.

I (@WilHarrington) sat down with Robert at The Basketball Movement to talk about his time in Europe.

Rob's experience playing overseas

After college, Rob Yanders headed to Sheffield, England to begin his rookie year of pro ball. He said that it was certainly a culture shock, but the team won the British Championship, easing his transition. "When you're successful and winning, everything is great." He credits the people he met and his teammate for helping to make it a great experience.

My experience in Europe helped mold me into the person I am today - my experiences getting away and getting cultured through these different walks of life. Sheffield, France, Scotland, Treviso, Norway, Zurich, Germany, Israel - because of basketball. Because of that round, orange thing, I’ve been to some amazing places.

In his pro career, he went on to win three European Championships, two regular season Championships, a National Cup, and Finals MVP. In France, Rob was also voted team MVP with both VCB and KABCA teams and earned All-Star Team honors in 2012. His time as a pro in Europe was certainly a success.

How Rob applies what he learned to The Basketball Movement

As a pro, Robert told me that you are always thinking about what comes next. Players are rarely guaranteed a safety net in their brief careers. When Rob thought about what he wanted to do, he leaned on what made him happy: basketball.

Enjoying and being around the sport of basketball does not have to end when playing days are over. Robert was a Community Recreation major in college and knew that he wanted to build or run a sports facility.

I grew up in Salvation Army, Boys and Girls Clubs, and YMCA’s. Those were places that gave me shelter to play the game and keep me safe from the streets.

He talked about the alone time you experience playing in a foreign country and the amount of time it allowed him to reflect on the future. He also got to participate in many camps, clinics, speaking opportunities, and mentorships. His leadership grew even more and allowed him to confidently assume his role within The Movement as founder and owner.

Advice for players considering college or the pro game

The advice that Robert shared on this topic centered around personal circumstances - situations vary greatly from player to player.

Do what’s best for your family. Invest in you and invest in your family - your time is valuable. Make sure you get the right council and information.

Rob also warned that the pro game will be a stark contrast for any players that are talented enough to play professionally straight out of high school. Playing with grown men that are playing for paychecks is a whole new world.

If the opportunity for a "one-and-done" type of player to play professionally presented itself, and they needed money, he may recommend going if the player is confident in professional ball as a career. For most though, an education is always a great idea. It will pay off more than fizzling out after a few pro seasons.

As Rob mentioned, receiving the right council and information is very important when considering playing in Europe or anywhere else. Coach Rob, Coach Anthony Shavies, and more can help players with this preparation right here at The Basketball Movement.

If you are interested in any capacity in playing overseas, please contact us and let us help you navigate the intimidating options that follow.

Robert Yanders' stock raisers at the Tournament of Champions

The 2019 Tournament of Champions has multiple nationally ranked prospects. There is always room to grow, and Robert Yanders has noted a few players that have raised their stock.

With two days down and one to go, Southwest Missouri has seen some of the best basketball teams and players the country has to offer. Some of these guys are already ranked pretty highly - including the nation’s top prospect - James Wiseman.

If you are number one, your stock can’t go up. For every single other player however, there is always at least one more step you can take to raise stock.

With such an impressive array of talent, the Tournament of Champions is an ideal spot for iron to sharpen iron. There is no better time to outwork and outpace your competitors than when going head-to-head. The Basketball Movement’s Founder, Robert Yanders has selected a few guys from the first two nights of action that have raised there stock.

Jared Jones - McEachern

In the McEachern vs. Shadow Mountain game last night, all eyes were on Jaelen House vs. Sharife Cooper. McEachern came out on top to advance to the Chamiponship tonight, but it was a bumpy ride. Jared Jones was a steady presence for the team, blocking multiple shots and putting in 12 points with big plays at the right time.

The Northwestern commit was quiet night one, but his play in game two against an even better squad was noteworthy. His athleticism, strong defense, and knack for a big stage earn him a spot among Rob’s stock raisers.

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Alyn Breed - McEachern

Joining Jones on the way to the championship tonight is his teammate - SG Alyn Breed. Has done an excellent job of taking pressure off of his fellow backcourt players. He has 20 total points through the first couple of games, but has done an excellent job on the perimeter and is playing good defense.

His athleticism allows him to play bigger than his 6’3” frame, and he is not afraid to scrap for boards. He has heard from some smaller schools in the Northeast, but has the looks of an underrated prospect.

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Noel Coleman - Sunrise Christian

Meeting McEachern in the championship with be Sunrise Christian Academy. Sunrise has some big names, but the offense starts with PG Noel Coleman.

Coleman is listed at 6’1” but has relatively nice length and explosiveness. He is a solid distributor on a deep and talented team - he deserves to be getting more attention at the collegiate level.

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Jovan Blacksher - Shadow Mountain

Grand Canyon commit, Jovan Blacksher has been in his bag all weekend. When he isn’t keeping the ball on a string, he is unleashing a barrage of threes like he did last night. His three triples in a row kept Shadow Mountain hanging tough, though they eventually fell to McEachern.

His well-rounded, yet scoring-oriented game actually reminds a bit of his coach, former NBA player, Mike Bibby.

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Zach Howell - Springfield Catholic

The Basketball Movement gym rat, Zach Howell looked good last night and has been showing that with minutes, he can be a great contributor, even on an already good team. Catholic played a great game last night despite the outcome. Part of that renewed vigor coming off a big night one loss was provided by Howell, whose outside shooting and competitive fire were big for the Irish.

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That’s it for Robert Yanders’ stock raisers from the first two nights of action. Ahead of tonight’s big games, dunk contest, and more, be sure to follow Rob Yanders on Instagram to be the first to see his picks for the Tournament of Champions fab five. See you tonight.

"The person is the player"

A Rob Yanders quote cuts deep as we reflect on the impact your life can have on your game.

Often, we are told to shut out emotions as players. The ideal basketball player is always calm, cool, and collected. It is one thing to play with passion, but carrying feelings of sadness, anger, or even a carefree attitude onto the court can negatively impact your play. All of this may be true, but it is unrealistic to expect this from players at all times.

Whether or not you realize it, your life is affecting you on the basketball court. This can be a positive or negative thing. When things are going well in your life, you have less worries. Less worry means less distraction to take away from what you are doing in game-time situations. Basketball can be a distraction from life on its own, but life always finds its way into your thoughts and demeanor.

“The person is the player” is a favorite quote of The Basketball Movement’s Founder, Rob Yanders. This quote was first brought to my attention in an interview with Trae Bell-Haynes, a pro player in Germany. Rob understands that players are more than just guards and forwards - they are people; sons, daughters, friends, students, employees, what have you.

This understanding is what makes Rob such a great coach. He cares for his players and knows that one way to improve on the court is to have a happy life.

Eliminating negativity from your life can be important for not just basketball, but everything you do. The issue with eliminating negativity is that it isn’t always possible. You can cut out toxic friends and influences, but some potentially negative aspects of your life may be more permanent.

It may be easier said than done, but it is important to try and shape the negativity into controlled aggression, motivation, and a competitive advantage. No one knows exactly what you’re going through besides yourself. If you must dwell on those issues, put a positive spin on them. Use things like basketball to enhance your life by making you rise above your problems. Not much beats the feeling of netting a shot, outrunning an opponent for a loose ball, or skying over everyone for a rebound. The harder you play, the more the issues of the world melt away.

There are hurdles to overcome in sport and in life. Sport is a very valuable learning ground for how to live your life in the best possible way.
— Lynn Davies

If things are generally positive in your life, you will naturally have fewer worries on the court. On the flip side though, you may have less reason to have an edge or play with a chip on your shoulder.

As a player, I personally had a pretty carefree attitude. Win-lose-or-draw, I was about the same after each game. I was happy to have been able to play and not too concerned when I didn’t get in as much as I would like. As a person, this contentment certainly seemed like a strength. As a player however, it resulted in a lack of drive that could hold me back in a competitive situation.

Positive thinking is more than just a tagline. It changes the way we behave. And I firmly believe that when I am positive, it not only makes me better, but it also makes those around me better.
— Harvey Mackay

Everyone is different. Each individual player has a unique situation and a unique way to cope. At The Basketball Movement, Rob Yanders and his coaches are able to bring out a competitive fire in complacent players like I used to be. They can also teach players with more difficult backgrounds to take what they feel may be holding them back and turn it into a monstrous drive to succeed.

Do your best to mold your life into what you want it to be. For help translating everything to the basketball court, contact The Basketball Movement here!

Defensive physicality: A Rob Yanders specialty

The Basketball Movement is a place that encompasses every aspect of the game - from offensive skill, defense, and beyond.

Rob Yanders, founder of The Basketball Movement, is always pushing his players to be the best men and women they can be. On and off the court, TBM prepares players to be disciplined, respectful team players.

There are many lessons to be learned out on the hardwood. Robert taught me (@WilHarrington) multiple lessons through the sport of basketball. One that stood out to me as a relatively under-sized player was defensive toughness and physicality.

Rob is not the biggest player himself, so he can bring perspective to players of all sizes. In his career (and still today), he played like a player much bigger than he is.

Robert taught me about defensive toughness the hard way

I was invited to one of Rob's many camps one Summer when I was probably 14 or 15 years old. I had been playing for a while at this point, but still certainly had plenty left to learn.

Skill-wise, I was a little behind most of the players at the camp. I was among the shorter players there as well, so I was feeling like I had a lot to prove. As always, Robert had us doing unique and engaging drills that had players visibly improving with each passing moment.

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Towards the end of the day, we started doing more "game scenario" drills that acted as small scrimmages. Rob is a pretty hands-on teacher, so he inserted himself in some of these drills, often matched up with myself since he is a guard.

He kicked my butt.

I was a pretty quick kid, but he managed to make me look like I had cement blocks for shoes. He kept one hand on me at all times, which is common to keep track of the player being guarded. What was uncommon was the firmness of that stiff-arm. Without fouling, he managed to dictate my every move.

He also used his body to establish a strong based and plant himself in front of me everywhere I tried to go. I felt like a big, strong post-player was shadowing me on the perimeter - it was exhausting and frustrating as an offensive player.

So what to do?

I could have plowed through him and starting picking up offensive fouls (in a drill...), but I decided to just soak up what he was doing to me and make mental notes of everything.

We finished the day with a full court 5-on-5 scrimmage. I did not start in the game but was prepared to make an impact coming off of the bench

A lot of the players I guarded were not only bigger than me, but at least as fast. I kept a strong hand on them at all times and tried to be a pest, cutting them off everywhere they turned and staying low. I picked up some charges and was able to prevent my man from doing what he wanted.

I carried that defensive physicality and tenacity forward as a player, eventually being known as a defensive specialist - an important piece to any team.

I have said this before, but I will continue to say it again and again: Parents, get your kids involved with Robert Yanders and The Basketball Movement. It helped me grow as a player and in my discipline and toughness as a person. Contact us here to make this happen as soon as possible.