Establishing a support system

In basketball and in life, you are going to need a support system. The further you want to go, the more important it becomes.

Whether it is 100 people or just one person, you are going to need a support system of some kind as you advance in your basketball career. You may have a circle already, but is it filled with individuals that truly support and want the best for you?

Yes, your mama can be your support system. Yes, a teacher, friend, or coach can be your support system. It doesn’t matter who it is as long as they are honest, supportive, and willing to have your back as you fight to achieve your dreams. Taking any path in life by yourself is going to be exponentially more difficult than doing it with the support of others. Even more difficult is going through life surrounded by the wrong people.

Individuals can unfortunately be toxic in many different ways. There are those that scheme and undermine you intentionally, though it may not always be immediately apparent. Sometimes people just don’t want you to succeed and will work behind the scenes to hold you back. It is a tough reality to face when this happens, especially when it comes from a source that you believed was in your corner.

Often, there is an even more difficult obstacle to detect. Some people in your corner may be unintentionally toxic. They think they help, they think they build you up, but really they are unaware that they do more harm than good. These situations are tough to deal with.

Cutting ties with someone you’re close to is going to be hard. However, it is imperative that you only surround yourself with those that will build you up and help you be the best person and player you can be.

The further you get in your basketball career, the more important this lesson will become. A negative influence is going to impact you at any level. That said, seriousness turns up as you select a college to play for. The more positive voices in your ear, the better. The more negative influences, the greater the consequences.

After college, if you are trying to play pro ball, you will need to work harder than you ever had in your life. You need everything to be as streamlined and beneficial as possible. At this stage, a negative influence can cost you everything. Make sure that your support system is filled with those that want to lift you up - not those that are looking for a meal ticket.

Knowing exactly who has your back can be more difficult than it sounds. Trust your instincts and listen to any nagging inclinations that someone may not have your best interest in mind. What is easy is stringing these people along for far too long. Don’t make that mistake; you will need to pull the weeds as soon as you can if you are going to grow and flourish to reach your potential (congratulations on reading the first and last gardening/basketball tie-in ever).

We used the words “difficult” and “tough” quite a bit in here. Establishing a support system is not always difficult, but maintaining it can be. Do your best, and really lean on those that you can trust completely. A strong support system will carry you far in all aspects of life!

Pursue your passion at The Basketball Movement

We encourage everyone to pursue their passion. If yours is basketball: you couldn’t be in a better place.

Each individual is gifted with a unique array of preferences, strengths, and interests. To maximize strengths, cater to preferences, and pursue interests is to seek a happy and successful experience in life. Woah… got deep for a second there. All that is to say that you need to do what makes you happy.

If you are reading this, you likely have some sort of tie to the game of basketball. Noting that it is a game is often important, but at the same time, it is a true passion for many people.

Whether you play the game, watch it, coach, ref, or just like a little 2K action, the game has something for everyone. The back-and-forth action is perfect to get adrenaline pumping. The mix of speed and strength, brute force and finesse, or offensive versus defensive prowess means that no game will be exactly the same. The constant is two teams that want to win and maybe even more so: don’t want to lose.

The Basketball Movement keeps its doors open for all kinds of players. Multi-sport athletes looking to get in shape can certainly come in and get in intense workouts. Players that just need to stay sharp with occasional drills or with our shooting gun are always welcome. Though the facility accommodates so many types of players, it was clearly built for those that are passionate about the game.

Rob Yanders, Founder of The Basketball Movement, is one of those individuals that is passionate about the sport of basketball. It is evident all over the facility. The off-court amenities such as the Chop Shop upstairs, the smart screen in the film room, the embroidered leather seats, everything is all detailed in ways that show Rob’s passion for the full breadth of the sport. Still, the true fire for the game blazes on the courts.

The Basketball Movement, Rob Yanders, and the other coaches are all at their absolute best when they are mixed with other individuals that have a true passion for the game.

A desire to improve is great, but a desire to be one of the best is the kind of all-in mentality that it takes to be an elite player. This facility is built so that you get out exactly what you put in. If you leave it all on our courts during workouts, you will improve without a doubt. The change could be subtle or drastic, but rest assured that the passionate will come away better.

Want to make varsity? Play at the D1 level? Get paid to play professional hoops? We can get you there; you will just have to be willing to put in the time and effort.

If basketball really is your passion, you have to reach out to us at The Basketball Movement. It is a business, but it is one ran by passionate hoop-heads that want little more than to bring others into the fold and maximize their potential on the court or even off of it. You will not regret pursuing your passion for basketball right here at The Basketball Movement.

What team chemistry really means

Coaches, fans, and basketball pundits all love to talk about team chemistry. What does it really mean?

At the risk of starting this off like a middle school essay, let’s just go ahead and state the literal definition of the word “chemistry”. The definition is not as clean and simple as we may like. However, you can see how when broken down, it can be simply applied to the sport of basketball.

Google defines chemistry as “the branch of science that deals with the identification of the substances of which matter is composed; the investigation of their properties and the ways in which they interact, combine, and change; and the use of these processes to form new substances.”

To start, we can fill in a few of the terms with basketball jargon: Identification of the players of which a team is composed. Identifying for our purposes isn’t just knowing your teammate’s names. To achieve ideal chemistry, you must know their strengths, weaknesses, and tendencies.

“…the investigation of their properties and the ways in which they interact, combine, and change…” Once you know them as mentioned above, you can begin to anticipate their actions, while also watching them grow as players and teammates.

Finally, “form new substances” is the resulting team. Players that know each other inside and out, on and off the court form the teams that will have what is referred to as great team chemistry.

Chemistry can be difficult for teams that introduce or bid farewell to players frequently. Still, stressing the importance of chemistry allows our coaches and teams to have a working understanding of what is necessary at all times.

We create a standard for how we want to do things and everyone’s got to buy into that standard or you really can’t have any team chemistry. Mediocre people don’t like high-achievers and high-achievers don’t like mediocre people.
— Nick Saban

When a team has good chemistry, it shows. Chemistry happens in the trenches, such as during practices. It also happens off the court, when teams are able to bond on more personal levels.

This is an important area for teams and we encourage our players to always stick together. Help your teammates up, give them affirmation in real life or on social media, just… be a friend.

For more on teamwork, motivation, and everything else basketball, keep it locked right here!

Thriving in the underdog role

With the NBA Playoffs underway, we have had the opportunity to see multiple teams embrace the underdog role and surprise the big dogs.

No-matter your record, seeding, reputation, anything, you can still beat the odds and be the best team for a game. Once you start rolling, you may gain momentum that can help you sustain that success. We have seen it many times before, especially in the NCAA Tournament as we did again recently. In the first round of the NBA playoffs, we have already gotten to see it multiple times.

Despite long odds, the Nets, Clippers, Magic, and Spurs have already pulled off upsets on the road. The biggest one came last night, as the Los Angeles Clippers deafeated the Golden State Warriors in game two of the series.

The Clippers were down by 31 in the third quarter before storming back to defeat the back-to-back NBA champs. Rookie Landry Shamet (formerly of Witchita State) hit a go-ahead three to seal it. Patrick Beverly continued to lock-down Kevin Durant and Lou Williams went on one of his scoring tears to climb back into it. The 31 point comeback marked the biggest comeback in NBA Playoff history.

This seems like a good time to remind you that no team is invincible. There are still plenty of games left in each of the NBA series’ involved in these upsets. That said, the landscape has significantly shifted, stealing confidence from one side and feeding it to the other. Confidence is big in the sport of basketball.

Everything negative - pressure, challenges - are all an opportunity for me to rise.
— Kobe Bryant

For that reason, it is important to approach every game and every moment with confidence. Believe that your shot will go in. Believe that your team can win the game. Believing is clearly not everything, but if you have put in the work, there is no reason that you can’t give it your all and compete. If you do that, then you can shift the odds at any time.

Being the underdog in a game or being overlooked as a player or team often means that you may be underestimated. Use that as fuel. Harness the chip on your shoulder. No one knows what you can do better than yourself. There isn’t much that is more satisfying than defying odds and proving nay-sayers wrong.

So be that team! Be that player! Don’t sweat rankings or records, just control what you can by working as hard as possible, being confident, and not backing down from a challenge.

Remember, to help you work as hard as possible, stay at the peak of your game, and keep raising that peak, contact The Basketball Movement. We believe in you and we can help you be ready for the big moments.

Don't be like Mike - The beauty of knowing your limits

Most players and fans grow up idolizing players on TV. The superstars carry a lot of appeal, but not everyone can be Michael Jordan.

We saw Kobe Bryant, who clearly modeled his game after Michael Jordan, grow into one of the greatest basketball players ever. Young players everywhere are honing their skills hoping to be just like LeBron James or Kevin Durant. Unfortunately, almost none of them will be. Don't worry! That is perfectly okay.

Everyone is made differently. You can hit the weight room every day,  but you are most likely not going to be able to bang in the paint with Dwight Howard or Shaq. Does that mean you should give up? Does not being Michael Jordan mean you should quit reaching? Heck no.

MJ could jump, handle, guard like crazy, and make defenders looks silly in almost every way. There aren't a lot of people who can be so extraordinary at so many aspects of the game.

So what do you do?

Find your personal strengths and work on them until it hurts. Shore up any weaknesses, but focus even more on what makes you a special player.

Just because you do have limits, doesn't mean you can't raise them. Have a decent jumper? Become a reliable jump shooter. Then, become a dangerous shooter. Always elevate each aspect of your game as much as possible, just don't get frustrated when you aren't the best there is.

If the Bulls had five fantastic shooting guards, would they start five shooting guards?

Every team needs bigs to crash the glass. Every team needs willing defenders who are content being the glue that doesn't stand out on the stat sheet. There are a lot of champions at every level of the game who are there because they put their ego aside and did what made them great for their team.

Don't be defined by your physical limits, but don't be afraid to embrace them either. There is a reason that Kyrie Irving doesn't care about dunking and Tim Duncan never worried about the three point line.

You can be great. Adapt and conquer the game in every way that is available to you. Don't be like Mike, be the best version of you that you can create.

Start by jumping aboard The Basketball Movement.

What is your plan for getting better?

Many of you are still deep in your basketball season, be it high school, college, or the NBA. What is your plan once it’s over?

This is one of our favorite times of the year for basketball (well, if we’re being honest it’s always our favorite time of the year for basketball). Players are at their busiest because regular seasons are winding down. From high school district contests to the NBA Playoffs, seasons are plateauing.

Even though players are busy, the best-of-the-best still find time to put in extra reps. Many of the players that come through our doors this time of year are men and women that have separated themselves from the boys and girls. Shout out to those players for coming in to work after their teammates have finished practice and gone home. We see you.

We also understand that it isn’t always possible to find adequate time for these extra reps. Especially at the collegiate level on down, other factors such as school work and family take up time in the evening or sometimes early morning. Even a few sessions a month with us can make a world of difference though. Anyway - down time is coming.

It is a bit early for looking ahead to the offseason, but it certainly doesn’t hurt. Whether your team is bounced in the first round or goes all the way, the season will end eventually. Once it’s over, do you have a plan to continue getting better?

Even the top athletes will lose too much ground if they wait until the next season to pick a basketball back up. Don’t lose your edge this offseason. Continue to improve so you can come back stronger, smarter, faster, and more skilled next season. The Basketball Movement wants to help.

Even as a multi-sport athlete, you still must make time to hone your craft. Otherwise, the competition may catch up, eclipse you, or pull further ahead of you. Contact The Basketball Movement to make a plan. We want to work with you to take your game to the next level. Show up to your first practice next season and wow your coaches and teammates. Coaches quickly start forming starting lineups in their heads as well as schemes, plays, and pecking order; insert yourself into the front of their mind.

Shoot us an email at basketballmovement@yahoo.com and be sure to include a contact number. One of our coaches will be in contact with you or your athlete so we can discuss the ways we can help. Skill development is our bread and butter, but what sets us apart is our conditioning, strength training, basketball IQ enhancement, film study, nutrition and stretching tips, and wealth of basketball knowledge and expertise.

If you are ready to get serious about getting better, contact The Basketball Movement.

You're not the only one that can ball

You may be good - even very good, but so are other players. Set yourself apart with help from The Basketball Movement.

A lot of players are familiar with being one of the top players on their team - maybe even the conference, division, state, league, what have you. It is a good feeling to be one of the best. You must keep in mind though, there is likely someone better than you.

You are not the only one that can ball. There is someone out there with a prettier jumper, someone who has a better nose for rebounding, someone stronger, or someone faster. No matter how good you may be at basketball, you are likely not the best.

So... what are you going to do about it?

Talent is one thing, but hard work is what really starts to differentiate players and allows them to take their game to the next level.

Hard work beats talent when talent fails to work hard.
— Kevin Durant

If you are willing to put in the time and effort to elevate every aspect of your game, you will be on your way to building separation between yourself and the competition. Basketball requires some natural athleticism at the higher levels of the game. Hard work and dedication to your craft is the top tool that can be used to make up for any comparative deficiencies that you my have.

The grind can't stop either. To work to be the best will require passion that allows you to constantly improve and keep learning more about basketball. 

Here comes the tough news. Not only are you not the only one that can ball; you also aren't the only one that can put in hard work. So, what then?

Set yourself apart with The Basketball Movement

You know the old expression "work smarter not harder"? That is partly true; just make sure that while you're working smarter, you are still working insanely hard. That is the specialty of Rob Yanders and The Basketball Movement. Get in, work your butt off to get better, and get out/take care of your body.

The Movement offers plenty for basketball players seeking an edge. The facility has two full-sized courts, basketball-specific workout equipment, and one of the best staffs for coaching and a player-centered development mentality. It even has a chop shop upstairs to get you a fresh cut, a deal with Gatorade so fridges are always packed, and Area 11 where you can finally relax with some NBA 2K, FIFA, and more.

Any player can find a place to get shots up. At TBM, we offer things like film analysis, skill development, team placement, and more all the way up to Euro-prep and NBA prep. You don't need to have professional aspirations though, as boys and girls of almost any age are welcome to take advantage of our curriculum, open-clinics, and coaching staff.

Basketball experience, top-tier facilities, and a hard-nosed continuous improvement mentality is what TBM can offer players looking to separate from the pack. An urban feel, but professional process at The Movement propels its players to the top.

You may not be the only one that can ball, but you can maximize your potential right here at The Basketball Movement to stay ahead of the competition.

Willingness to adjust your game

You may have a good way of doing things. Are you willing to adjust your methods to become great?

A lot of players have multiple things they are good at. Solid free throw shooting, decent assist to turnover ratio, and serviceable defense can make you a contributor for a team. A player should not settle for these things. Shooting free throws at 70 percent? You may have to take some expert advice and be willing to tweak your shot to get to 75 or 80 percent.

Especially when it comes to shooting, players are often too proud to admit that they need to adjust from their old way of doing things. There have been a few players that have made it far with unorthodox shooting motions, but few of them have been considered great shooters.

You could get away with funky shooting if you make up for it in other ways like say... Dwight Howard. But let's be honest, you likely aren't Dwight Howard.

Being able to step back and take advice from those who have played the game at a high level and closely monitored the successes and failures of other players a high levels - that is how you can improve.

To be a good or great player, you will need to be able to adapt to doing things the best way possible. Keeping a low, strong dribble will reap more rewards than dribbling loose and high. Being tall will help get rebounds, but working hard at pursuing and having a nose for angles will elevate your ability. Always be willing to improve.

We can always be average and just do what’s normal. I’m not in this to do what’s normal.
— Kobe Bryant

If you are already doing something your way or a prior mentor/coaches way at an impressive clip - that's great. A good trainer or coach can recognize that and allow you to keep doing your thing. However, if they advise you to tweak it slightly to improve consistency (like keeping your elbow in a bit more while you shoot), it can't hurt to listen and give it a legitimate try.

We may be biased, but results don't lie. The Basketball Movement is the premier training facility in this part of the country, with some of the best coaches and trainers. If you're already good, that's awesome - we love it. There is however an opportunity for you to become great and we would love to help you. Contact us here to take your game to the next level.

Using size to your advantage

Basketball players come in many shapes and sizes. Each of these various sizes can be used to a player's advantage.

For a long time, basketball was closed off to only the biggest individuals at its highest levels. Throwing it into the post to let your bruiser back his/her way to the cup was the most effective form of offense. Times have changed.

The game itself has evolved, as has our understanding of what it takes to win. Foul-calling and the three pointer have been a pair of equalizers in addition to the knowledge of what it takes to succeed at smaller sizes.

It still certainly helps to be big, but now more than ever, smaller players have opportunities to compete as well.

Guards can use skill and speed

Perimeter players can be light and/or on the shorter side, while still achieving success. A great shot can go a long way in the sport of basketball. Ball-handling and passing as well. A taller player may be able to get a better view of the floor, but being lower to the ground often means improved ball-handling prowess and bounce pass options.

There are numerous examples of shorter players experiencing great success at all levels of the game. The Basketball Movement's Rob Yanders played professionally with grit and savvy rather than overpowering opponents with strength and size - though quickness and toughness helped too.

Post players aren't going anywhere

Just because it is easier to be an undersized baller does not mean that post-play is out the door. A surplus of height, or even extra (managed) weight/muscle are always an intimidating factor on the court.

The taller you are, the closer you are to the rim. Offense and defense both become a bit easier with height. The top rim-protectors have always been tall with an above-everage wingspan.

Even if you are on the bigger side, but height isn't part of the equation, there are ways to succeed. The bigger you are, the more you will be able to impose your will on smaller players.

Not too big, but not too small?

You can definitely work with this too. Being somewhere in between means that you may be able to matchup with multiple positions.

A well-rounded skill set will help you to use your size on the perimeter or hang with the bigs down low.

The Basketball Movement is the ideal place to maximize your potential and learn to take advantage of your stature - no matter what that may be. Contact us to schedule some time into your Summer to step up your game with our great coaches and facility!

Leadership from all positions

When we think of leaders in basketball we often think of point guards or top-scorers. Leaders can actually come from any position.

Inspiration can come from a lot of places. When your team is tired, a fiery speech from a coach or a commanding shout from a teammate can ignite a flame that helps everyone push through. Leaders keep heads from hanging when you're down and egos humble when you're up.

There are a lot of great examples of leaders in today's game from Gregg Popovich and Mike Krzyzewski to Chris Paul and Al Horford.

The Basketball Movement has its own great leader in Founder and Coach, Rob Yanders.

Leadership can be vocal or even just by example. Not every player has the personality to be a vocal leader for their team, even if they're the best players (example: Kawhi Leonard).

Leadership does not always come from the top

If the top player for a team is not up for being vocal, that role needs to fall to someone else. Communication is a very important part of basketball - on fastbreaks, offense, and especially on defense.

The top vocal leader on your team may even come off of the bench. Players that are engaged and helpful from the bench are much better for a team than players who quietly wait to enter the game.

The best way to be a leader - no-matter your role the team - is to lead by example. If you are a player that does not give up on plays, is always pushing the pace, and defends tenaciously, you are constantly setting a good example for your teammates. That is called leadership.

Leadership is diving for a loose ball, getting the crowd involved, getting other players involved. It’s being able to take it as well as dish it out. That’s the only way you’re going to get respect from the players.
— Larry Bird

You may be the last player to come off the bench at the end of the game. If you play hard and scrape your way back into the game, you can inspire others to follow.

Leadership is incredibly important in basketball as well as other aspects of life. Remember that you can be a leader by working as hard as possible and setting an example for others to follow, no-matter your position or role.

 

Keeping your head in the game

Knowing and understanding various situations in the game of basketball can be the difference between winning and losing.

There is a lot that goes into understanding the sport of basketball. There is more to it than putting the ball in the hoop. Coaching and experience are two very important pieces involved in this understanding.

The Basketball Movement can help to further a player's knowledge about many aspects of the sport. The nuances of ball-handling, shooting, and how to conduct yourself are a few examples.

Game-time situations come at you fast. Sometimes it is in those instances that you learn the most, whether you get it right or especially if you get it wrong.

I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life and that is why I succeed.
— Michael Jordon

Even the most experienced can still falter

For all of your coaching, practice, and game-experience, you will still make mistakes. Overplaying passing lanes, trying too hard to thread a pass into the post, the list of possibilities is very long.

A player must keep track of what they can control. Always being aware of the time on the game clock (or shot clock), how many fouls you have, and the score are simple, yet important facets of the game.

Even a grizzled NBA veteran like JR Smith can still make basic mistakes. Don't be a JR Smith.

Keep your head in the game and control as much of what happens as you can. Mistakes will happen; the best players often average the most turnovers.

Don't sweat the small stuff, but also do not assume that you will make the correct decisions at all times. Take deep breaths, analyze as much of each situation as time will allow, and play the game.

To continue taking your game to the next level get in touch with us here at The Basketball Movement.

TBM: Applying basketball lessons to life

Basketball can teach you a lot. Carry the discipline and team-mentality with you in all aspects of life.

The Basketball Movement and the sport itself can teach you many things. The Movement focuses on skill development, conditioning, and team training. It also focuses on "soft skills" such as leadership, speaking, film analysis, marketing, and exposure.

All of these things are centered around the wonderful sport of basketball. However, the skills that you acquire can be applied off the court as well as on.

Focus, discipline, and competitiveness can benefit you in practice or in a game. What about after the buzzer sounds? The same skills are necessary for the most important parts of your life such as education, employment, and interpersonal relationships.

The discipline applied in practice needs to be applied to homework. Then, the locked-in focus of a game can be mirrored in test or quiz situations. At work, leadership and the ability to communicate effectively are paramount. Tough boss? No problem; you have probably already had a tough coach.

Follow your passion at The Basketball Movement

Hard work seems much easier when it is focused on something your passionate about. Think of the tough classes at school or projects at work as running lines/conditioning for basketball. There will always be parts that you don't like, but they are necessary to get a well-rounded finished product.

None of this is to say that you have to go through life with your nose to the grindstone 24/7. Never forget to have fun! Basketball is a blast to play, school is one of the most fun times of your life, and working means being able to fund some of your favorite things.

One of the best places that you can go to establish great habits and a winning mentality is The Basketball Movement.

Rob Yanders and his team of coaches have a passion, not just for basketball, but for developing excellent people with every opportunity to succeed. For an example of the impact The Movement can have, check here for a testimonial. For more on The Basketball Movement, check here.

If you are ready to contact us immediately, check here! It is always a good time to work on your game and a winning mentality for life. Let your friends at The Basketball Movement help propel you or your player to the top!

Setting goals for yourself

Setting goals is an important thing to do at any stage in life. Do not forget to set some on the court and off.

Many of basketball's brightest stars were born with a lot of natural ability. However, most of them still had to work incredibly hard to get where they are today. Hard work is best when it is directed by established plans and aimed at particular goals.

The Basketball Movement can help players to establish plans and regimens to help them along the way in achieving those goals.

It is not hard to find quotes and tips from people and players that have experienced success in their careers. Setting goals is important, but the growth and experience obtained in the pursuit of those goals is often the true victory.

It’s not about looking for outcomes, but just enjoying the process. That’s when you become in the moment.
— Steve Nash

Goals can be big or small - daily or long-term. They are important in sports like basketball, but also in many other aspects of life.

What goals will you set?

Different individuals may come up with very different goals and aspirations. As a basketball player, one player's goal may be to crack the starting five on their Junior Varsity squad. Another  may want to become a professional, overseas or in the NBA.

Skill development represents smaller, more compartmentalized goals. Your goal may be to improve your free throw percentage by a certain amount or to add two new post moves to your repertoire by the end of the Summer.

A winner is someone who recognizes his (or her) God-given talents, works his (or her) tail off to develop them into skills, and uses these skills to accomplish his (or her) goals.
— Larry Bird

Personal goals off the court are important also. Goals for school or for a career help you to stay focused on what is important. Try to make a point to be an achiever in all that you do.

For more motivation, basketball news, and Basketball Movement goodness, keep looking around our blog here!

 

Maintaining a "next play" mentality

Basketball is unique from other major sports with its non-stop action. It is important to keep your head up at all times.

In football, when the person with the ball gets tackled, you regroup and set up a new play to try again. After so many attempts, you either score or give up the ball to head to the sidelines for a while. In baseball, you strikeout or hit, then get a lengthy break.

Basketball is different.

If you miss a shot in basketball, you either need to attempt to rebound your own miss or be ready to sprint back on defense. There is not always time to regroup after a miss and especially not after a turnover.

Let's say you have back-to-back turnovers; is there time to hang your head and feel bad for yourself or feel embarrassed? I think you know where we are going with this.

Keep your head up and move on to the next play

Shooting slumps happen. Consecutive lapses in judgement happen. That is just part of the sport of basketball. When these things affect your mentality or your hustle, that is when you actually have a problem on your hands.

It may be tempting to hang your head when things are not going your way. There are a few big problems with that. Your teammates will see that and lose trust, your coach may see and pull you out, or the other team may see and gain confidence.

I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life and that is why I succeed.
— Michael Jordan

The best thing that you can do is instantly focus on the next play. Just stay in the zone and play the game that you have been practicing and practicing. If it results in a defensive stop, you will regain some confidence. If you work to get a layup, it may breed confidence in your shots from every range.

The "next play" mentality is relevant at all levels of the game. You will miss a lot of shots in your career, which will allow lots of opportunities to bounce back. Stay ready and seize those opportunities.

Playing on either side of a blowout

In your basketball career, you will undoubtedly be a part of a few blowout games on one side or the other.

We hope that you will always be on the winning side, but that may not always be the case. Sometimes you will be on a team that is heavily outmatched; maybe things just were not clicking for you at all.

Being down by so many points can be disheartening. No one wants to lose so badly in front of their fans and peers. The desire to not let this happen though is an important piece of competitive spirit. We are not saying that avoiding getting blown out should be top-of-mind entering a game, but if it starts looking that way, then it should probably click.

"Blown out" sounds a little subjective. It could mean different things to players at each level of the game. For the NBA it may mean 20 to 25-plus points or so. For NCAA, more like 15 to 20-plus, since the game is a slower pace. High school is played at many different levels, but that 15-20 range likely is not too far off depending on how early it happens.

What to do if your team is getting blown out

If you find yourself in this situation, there is no need to panic OR hang your head. Large deficits happen frequently, and occasionally, they are overcome. Check a recent example by the OKC Thunder in the NBA Playoffs. The Thunder were down 25 in the third quarter.

The number one thing that you can do for your team in these situation is to continue playing hard. The fans will see it, the coach will see it, and your teammates will see it. Set an example for the rest of your team by playing through and attempting to come back.

Who knows, you may just pull an upset. Such wins are often the most memorable, so do not pass up such an opportunity.

What if you are the team that is applying the beatdown?

Basketball is at its best when played between two evenly matched teams that take the contest down to the wire. It is more entertaining and more fun (though comebacks are pretty great).

In many situations, how to proceed in such times is dictated by the coach. Are the teams so mismatched that you could pour it on as much as possible? Is the other team a threat to come back and need to be kept a arm's length?

Continuing to play hard in a blowout is not a bad thing, but it is a better opportunity to play right. If you are up by so much that it ceases to be fun for either team, it is a great time to focus on fundamentals and run through your playbook in a game-time situation for excellent practice. Never pass up an opportunity to improve.

For more on the sport we all love, keep it locked to The Basketball Movement and follow us on Twitter and Instagram.

Training and skill development vs. shooting around

Anytime you have a ball in your hands is an opportunity to get better. Be sure to make the most of your time with The Basketball Movement.

The most successful players make plenty of time to get up shots, work on their conditioning, and hone their craft. Almost any time that can be spent with the sport of basketball will improve your game, even if it is just an imperceptible amount.

There is a big difference however between shooting around in the driveway, park, or gym compared to structured and intentional training. You can get a lot of free throws in at the park near your house, but what if your elbow is too wide from your body or you are not bending your knees enough?

Practice does not make perfect. Only perfect practice makes perfect.
— Vince Lombardi

Nothing beats supervised, disciplined training when working to improve as much as possible. This is not to say that messing around in your driveway at home or just playing "21" after school are not good. Basketball is a game after all, and doing anything active and fun is time well-spent. Just remember when it comes to improving, there is such a thing as time best spent. 

Step up your game with The Basketball Movement

For the ultimate in training and skill development, we are the area leader in maximizing your time and efforts in the game of basketball.

With The Movement, you can get group or even one-on-one time with coaches dedicated to making you the best you can be. The facility is completely centered around player development, with low-impact, basketball specific equipment and full-sized courts.

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There are some things that you cannot achieve on your own, practicing out in the driveway. The Basketball Movement provides the full basketball experience for players of all skill levels. Even if you can just get in on the occasional open-clinic on Saturdays (2nd to 8th grade), you are taking steps to pass your opposition.

The One Rep from Glory training videos can give you the next best thing. The series includes tips and tricks on ball handling, separation moves, finishing moves, shooting off the bounce, and catch and shoot tips.

Contact us to find out how to maximize your basketball abilities. Don't forget to check out our YouTube channel too for some more drills.

 

Playing for a tough coach or with a tough teammate

You can pick your friends, you can pick your nose, but you can't always pick your teammates or coach. Or something like that.

If you have played a sport for any length of time, you have likely already encountered either a tough coach or teammate. Teams consist of many different styles, attitudes, and demeanors. In some ways, this is what makes team sports special. Sometimes though, it can be really hard to adjust to.

You will have teammates over the years that will not play hard. Some may not even have any desire to play at all. Some will hog the ball, others may pick on you at practice. These things will seem very difficult to get over in the moment, but in the long term, you will be better for it. Not only as a player, but as a person.

These people will not be limited to sports, but all aspects of life. You will experience many of the same personality traits someday at work, or in social situations. Learning to roll with the punches and taking the high road is not easy, but it is a key part of growth.

Ask not what your teammates can do for you, ask what you can do for your teammates.
— Magic Johnson

Not meshing with your coach

Not always getting along with teammates is one thing. Those are your peers that you share many of the same circumstances with. Even more difficult is experiencing a coach that rubs you the wrong way or that you do not see eye-to-eye with.

It is easier said than done, but this situation must be treated similarly to the teammate issue above. Taking the high road in a situation where you are the subordinate is a very backwards-feeling scenario.

If your coach is on you for no reason, stand tall and do not let him/her get a rise out of you. If you are not getting minutes or situations that you deserve, keep grinding until everyone in the gym can clearly see the mistake. Learning to turn the other cheek to those in positions of authority will pay off exponentially as far as your growth as a person.

Know when things have gone too far

Standing tall and not retaliating is the go-to response when you encounter these tough situations. That does not mean that you should just allow yourself to be bullied or harassed. If you feel that things have gone to far with a teammate, bring it up to them. If that does not resolve the issue, it may be time to approach the coach.

If the coach is the problem, discuss it with someone that you trust. A lot of coaches are intense people, and it may just be that they get a bit too passionate about the sport or getting the most out of their players. If it is going beyond that or becoming personal, it may be time to voice your concerns to someone with the ability to resolve the situation.

For examples of great coaches, a player-first atmosphere, and a true team mentality, you are in the right place and Robert Yanders is your man. Contact The Basketball Movement to get involved in our program!

 

Perseverance: 32-year-old rookie makes a splash

After 10 years in the NBA's G-League (formerly the D-League), Andre Ingram finally plays an NBA game.

Andre Ingram was signed by the Los Angeles Lakers to play the final two games of their season. Several of the Lakers' young players are nursing injuries and the team has been officially eliminated from the playoff race for over a week now.

At 32-years-old, Ingram was called up for the first time from his 10-year stint in the G-League. According to the NY Times, he is the oldest American rookie in 50 years. He got the nod to enter the game in the first quarter from Head Coach Luke Walton. It was then that Ingram did what he had been doing for years, made it rain from deep.

Apparently, this fella has hit three pointers at a 46 percent  clip in his G-League career. He is the all-time leader in made triples in the league. He drained all three of his attempts from deep in the first half, finishing the home loss with 19 points, 3 boards and blocks, one 1 assist, steal, and turnover.

Basketball has given us a shining example of perseverance in Andre Ingram

The man's G-League stats are a bit of a head-scratcher. How had this three point sniper not been called up before? No doubt Ingram had been scratching is now greying head before any of the rest of us. Yet he patiently waited for his time to come, and he stepped up to the plate when his number was called.

This type of feel-good story is not uncommon in the sport of basketball. The sport requires a lot of hard work and grit, and this player personifies that. More often than not, hard work pays off in some shape or form. Sometimes, that requires patience, which is not always easy.

We are thrilled that Andre Ingram got to live out his dream (and make approximately 73 percent of his G-League salary in three days). We wish him luck in the Lakers' final game tonight. Maybe someone will take a chance on the long range shooter next season and we can continue to watch his story unfold.

The NBA's Lou Willams sets a great example off the bench

The NBA has a shoo-in Sixth Man of the Year in Lou Williams of the Los Angeles Clippers.

Coming off the bench is not always as easy as Lou Williams makes it look. He led his team in scoring and assists, taking on a larger role after the Blake Griffin trade earlier in the season. The guard averaged career-best numbers across the board - all in his 13th pro season.

Williams has predominantly come of the bench his entire professional career. He was the NBA's Sixth Man of the Year in 2014-15 with the Toronto Raptors as well, averaging a career-best 15.5 PPG. This season he is averaging 22.6, nearly becoming an All-Star and almost pushing the Clippers to the playoffs.

A great perimeter shooter, Sweet Lou has to always be focused so he can come in firing. Coming off the bench means warming up with everyone, but then sitting to start each contest. As a sixth man, he comes in decently quickly. But what about the 7th, 8th, or 9th man?

Coming off the bench is a challenge - Embrace it

There is no denying that it is more glamorous to be a starter in your sport. There are only so many starting spots, and it is up to the coach to determine who gets them. If you come off the bench, but believe that you should be starting, you are in an excellent position to prove it.

As a reserve, you will predominantly be playing against other reserves. If you are able to stand out and effectively dominate your opponents, then that will show to not only your coach, but your teammates, and spectators. Sometimes however, that is just the most effective strategy that the team needs.

Many teams choose to bring very talented players off of the bench to balance the skill level they have on the floor at all times. Lou Williams is the leading scorer for the Clips because he can score like crazy against opposing reserves.

Donte DiVincenzo was the NCAA Finals MVP despite coming off the bench. Coming off the pine does not mean you cannot still get on a heater. Andre Iguodala came off the bench in the 2015 NBA finals and won MVP with his stellar defense.

Do not worry about starting, worry about helping the team

As we have discussed before, there is beauty in knowing your limits. If you are not given a starting opportunity, that does not mean that you cannot strive to become the team's top defender, rebounder, or playmaker. Accepting a role is one of the most important things a player can do to propel a great team.

The award is not final, but everyone and their brother can see that Lou Williams will become the 2017-18 NBA Sixth Man of the Year. Congratulations to him and all of the other competing players such as Eric Gordon, Will Barton, and Missouri Valley Conference Alum Fred VanVleet.

What to do during the offseason

Maybe your team is not in the state championship, or NCAA Tournament, or well... playing at all right now. What should you do?

We are going to hit on the basics, but of course our biggest offseason recommendation is checking out everything offered at The Basketball Movement. The Movement provides training in every aspect of the game for every level of player.

That is the obvious answer, so we will break it down more in a bit. Here are the basics for how to use your time in the offseason.

#1 - Work on your skills

During the season, you probably work a lot on situations, plays, and team drills. During the offseason is the best time to improve as an individual. Particularly, this is a great time to work on your shot and your ball handling.

Individual ball handling can be practiced in the gym or driveway. You can work on your shot anywhere you can find a goal to achieve a quicker release or smoother stroke. Have a coach to guide you through? Even better. Where do you find such a person? I think you know.

#2 - Work on your body

For players that or old enough (consult parents, coaches, or even a doctor), the offseason is the best time to hit the weight room. You do not need to be Arnold Schwarzenegger on the court, just achieve your body's balance to be as strong as necessary.

It has been said that you cannot teach speed, but even if you have a limit, you likely have not hit it yet. Speed and agility training are very real (inquire to The Movement for details). Agility as well on conditioning are very important and there is always more time for a run during the offseason.

#3 - Refresh your mind

The offseason is also a great time to reflect on what you accomplished or consider the goals you were not able to obtain. Take note of areas where you would like to have been better, making sure you focus on those during the offseason as well as your strengths.

Also, have fun! After a long season it is important to take a little time off as well to clear your mind. Play another sport to remain active, or even rest to nurse any nagging injuries or give your body some time to relax. Then once you are ready to get back, get in touch with The Basketball Movement of course!

The fight is won or lost far away from witnesses - behind the lines, in the gym, and out there on the road, long before I dance under those lights.
— Muhhamad Ali

In case you had not noticed, a solution to a lot of these fixes has been sprinkled in a few times. At The Basketball Movement, you will find top-of-the-line equipment to help you build muscle and stay in shape. Not to mention staff dedicated to improving your agility, skills, and mind.

To become the best player you can be and make the most out of your offseason this year, make your way to the basketball mecca of the Midwest - The Basketball Movement.