Push limits with Rob Yanders and The Basketball Movement

What limits you from being the best player you can possibly be? The Basketball Movement can help you push those limits.

Every individual has limits, whether perceived or literal. A literal limit may be that you are considered undersized for the sport of basketball; you can’t change when you are done growing. A perceived limit is that your small stature means you can’t guard bigger players, get up for rebounds, and so on. Those are perceived limits because you can do something to change that. We can help.

When they say you can’t, they show you their limits, not yours.
— Kevin Keenoo

One of the biggest lessons that I (Site Blogger, @WilHarrington) learned growing up came on the basketball court. My teacher was Robert Yanders.

I’d been working out with Rob on and off for a year or so and was just 13 or 14 years old. I had started bringing a teammate along and it was definitely elevating our skill level. The breakthrough for me though was all about pushing limits and the power of mind over matter.

We were nearing the end of one of Rob’s trademark grueling workouts, got to shed our weighted vests, and got on the line to do some running. He wanted us to do a simple down-and-back, but put a very limited amount of time on the clock. He blew his whistle and my friend and I took off, touched the line to head back, and didn’t quite make it before the buzzer sounded.

We thought Rob was simply going to have us try again. However, he stepped over to the scorer’s table and took a second off the clock. Was this punishment? We lined up again, made our attempt… and missed the mark. We were completely exhausted at this point. What did Rob do? Let us grab a drink to come back and try again? Let us hit the restroom to vomit in peace? Of course, he took another second off the clock.

My friend and I never made eye contact, but we clearly had the same thought flash in our mind. “This guys is crazy. This is an all-out sprint, because if we don’t do it this time, we’ll be doing this until we leave in wheelchairs.”

“Ready,” Rob shouted with his whistle in his mouth. “Go!”

Adrenaline propelled our tired legs and carried us like we were running for our lives. There was nothing but teeth gritting, sweat flying, and the blur of two desperate white boys moving faster than they had ever moved. We went down and back, both touching the final baseline with a second or two to spare.

This lesson didn’t change the fact that I was five-foot-eight and just interested in playing the sport for fun. I never had NCAA aspirations or professional delusions. But what I learned that day shaped me as an athlete in general and as a person. It showed me that my limits were in my hands and I could push them as far as I wanted.

The confidence I gained from that day in the gym that would become The Basketball Movement helped me to push my high school self to two All-State baseball selections, contribute to a basketball team that took 3rd in state, be an All-District cross country runner (hell, even All-District choir for that matter), and the courage to date the girl that would become my wife.

That all may seem like a real leap to draw from a down-and-back run. Those who have trusted Rob Yanders to help them like I have can attest to what I’m saying though.

Asuming you are not already the best in the world, you must try to push your limits to see what you can really do. Not only on the court, but in all aspects of life. For those interested - reach out. The Basketball Movement was built for this. We’re ready if you are.